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The Peak Indonesia - Deby Vinski - Rejuvenating Indonesia

Deby Vinski - Rejuvenating Indonesia

the peak indonesia

Published by BeritaSatu Media Holdings

Category: Home, Living & LifeStyle

Edition : July 2016

Pages : 100

ISBN : 9-772086-927458

Published : 01 Jul 2016

ELIXIR OF YOUTH

Time and tide wait for no man. Aging is part of life and most of hope that we can age gracefully. But it is the nature of man and woman to fight the aging process and with modern medicine, it seems we can at least slow it down.

 

This is where Dr. Deby Vinski comes in. Her anti-aging clinic The World Preventive & Anti-Aging Centre (WRC) is well known among Jakarta’s well-heeled and she is highly respected for her professionalism and her work.

 

She spends most of her time customising special programmes for patients, helping them reverse the aging process while rejuvenating healthy cells so as to optimise one’s health. “My latest specialisation involves stem cell therapy.  I’m interested in 3D print organs made from the patient’s own body. I want to be a part of this big step to fight our genetic destiny,” Dr. Deby tells The Peak Indonesia.

 

No doubt many Indonesians are happy that Dr. Deby  is able to keep them looking young. How we look and feel is critical to our well being and to our self confidence. If we feel good, we usually also look good.

 

But our decision to profile Dr. Deby on our cover goes beyond her professional work. The primary reason for selecting her as the July edition cover is that she represents the new Indonesian woman. Apart from her day-to-day work, she finds time to run multiple companies as well as serve as the chairwoman advisor for the World Royal Society whose work involves projects in 155 Kingdoms and Sultanates including Brunei Darusalam, Belgium and the UK. In Indonesia, the group works with FSKN to preserve Indonesia’s Royal Heritage.

 

Keeping busy, fit and having a range of interests is ultimately the real elixir of youth. It keeps us physically and mentally healthy. Getting up in the morning with a purpose and a goal gives our lives meaning. And it does not hurt to have some help in slowing the aging process as well.

 

SARI KUSUMANINGRUM

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  • The Peak Indonesia - Wulan Tilaar

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  • The Peak Indonesia - Edward Hutabarat

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    involve the cannibal Asmat tribes, which still roam the jungles today. This tale is enough for some to second think their travel plans but for Edo, it made him all the more curious. After travelling for six days and nights, subsisting on not much more than bananas and rice, Edo reached Agats in Pap

    ua. “I go there and it’s like a paradise,” he says of the pristine waters and knotted mangroves that team with fish and colourful coral. “It was a message from God. He said to me ‘Edo listen if you want to see my beautiful land, it’s not easy Edo'.” &nbs

    p;

  • The Peak Indonesia - Sutanto Hartono

    ON FINDING SUCCESS IN THE CREATIVE WORLD AND THE FUTURE OF TELEVISION   “AS PART OF MY PERSONAL CAREER ASPIRATIONS AND SATISFACTION, WITH MY NEXT CHALLENGE, I HOPE TO TO COMBINE THIS TRADITIONAL MEDIA WHICH IS VERY DOMINANT IN INDONESIA, WITHIN NEW MEDIA.”   FOR TELEVISION MEDI

    A IS TO DETERMINE HOW WE CAN INTEGRATE WHAT’S ON THE TV SCREEN WITH THE ONLINE COMPONENT … I THINK THAT AT THE END OF THE DAY, TV WILL STILL BE POPULAR. PEOPLE  WILL JUST BE DOING OTHER THINGS WHILE THEY WATCH TV.”

  • The Peak Indonesia - Rina Ciputra Sastrawinata

    THE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEUR Together with her farther, Rina Ciputra Sastrawinata is on a mission to bridge the divide betwwen business and art. In order to promote Indonesia talent to the globe. “My father has this dream that we can actually improve the people’s standard of living if we te

    ach them to do business, in other words if we teach them to become entrepreneurs.”

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